Educational Outreach

Dominic Joel Ombati

According to the United Nations environmental program, lead (Pb) is a heavy metal that is toxic even at very low exposure levels and has acute and chronic effects on human health. In the environment, lead (Pb) is also toxic to plants, animals and micro-organisms. Lead (Pb) can originate from human activities (anthropogenic) or from natural sources (geogenic). Lead poisoning occurs when humans especially children are exposed even to low levels of lead (Pb).

Lead (Pb) poisoning is a serious health problem globally and almost every county in United States has a childhood lead (Pb) poisoning prevention program. Studies carried out in Benin, Cameroon, Côte d’Ivoire, Egypt, Ethiopia, Guinea, Kenya, Morocco, Mozambique, Nigeria, Sudan, Tanzania, Togo, Uganda, and Zambia found some paints sold for home use containing extremely high lead levels of up to 100,000 ppm. These concentrations are several times more than the 90 ppm United Nations recommended limit of lead (Pb) in paint.

Many people know so little or nothing about lead (Pb) poisoning. To create awareness on this health problem, I have developed an educational outreach program which has now  more than 10,000 followers living in 23 countries including United States. Most of my audience is from sub-Saharan Africa which has experienced the largest known childhood lead (Pb) poisoning outbreak but with almost no awareness on digital platforms. To the best of my knowledge, this program is the largest and first of its kind in addressing childhood lead (Pb) poisoning in sub-Saharan Africa through social media network sites.

My educational outreach is through this website which is connected to a Facebook page and group. The Facebook page, group, and this website provide links to free credible information on childhood lead (Pb) poisoning. The Facebook page is connected to Facebook group under different names. The Facebook group and the links below allows you to access free downloadable pdf materials on childhood lead (Pb) poisoning for use and sharing with the goal of reaching as many people as possible.

Links to credible educational materials on childhood lead (Pb) poisoning (Click on the link).

1. California Department of Public Health (CDPH), Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention Branch (CLPPB).

2. World Health Organization (WHO), Lead Poisoning.

3. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention.

4. United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Lead.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention information page is detailed and helpful. Some of the information it contains include the following: (Click on the link).

  1. Primary and secondary lead (Pb) exposure prevention.
  2. Sources of lead (Pb) exposure.
  3. Health effects of lead (Pb) exposure.
  4. Testing children for lead (Pb) poisoning.
  5. Blood lead (Pb) levels in children.
  6. Populations at higher risk of lead (Pb) poisoning.
  7. Frequently asked question about lead (Pb) poisoning.

United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Lead (Pb) information page has detailed educational materials. Some of the information it contains include the following: (Click on the link).

  1. Basic information about lead (Pb).
  2. How to protect your family from sources of lead (Pb).
  3. Basic information about lead (Pb) in drinking water.
  4. Lead (Pb) air pollution.
  5. Pdfs with lead (Pb) safety documents and outreach materials.

California Department of Public Health (CDPH), Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention Branch (CLPPB) educational pdf materials are one of the best and most comprehensive. Some of the information they contain include the following: (Click on the link).

  1. Ways to protect your child from lead (Pb).
  2. How to keep a newborn safe from lead (Pb).
  3. How to check for lead (Pb) in and around your home.
  4. Sources of lead (Pb).
  5. How to protect your child from lead (Pb) in paint.
  6. How to protect your child from lead (Pb) in dirt.
  7. How to identify some ceramics and pottery that may contain lead (Pb).
  8. Common folk remedies that contain lead (Pb).
  9. How to protect your child from lead (Pb) in jewelry.
  10. The need to have your child tested for lead (Pb).
  11. How healthy foods can keep your child safe from lead (Pb) poisoning.

World Health Organization (WHO), Lead Poisoning information page includes the following: (Click on the link).

  1. Key facts about lead (Pb).
  2. Sources of lead (Pb) and how people can be exposed to lead (Pb).
  3. Health effects of lead (Pb) in children.